Exercise 8 – Varying the pose

In the this exercise, Varying the pose, we are asked to take one subject and adopt various poses that would normally been seen as classic poses. This would include variations in hand, head, mid and whole body positions.

These poses would be different for male and female subjects, and once again I have Elaine to ask as my personal model for the shots below. Certain poses will command attention from the viewer, such as when the subject is looking directly at the camera lens, or to give a more detached affect the subject maybe looking away out of frame almost as if they are nota aware the camera is even there.

I took the following shots early in the morning using natural light coming from a window, I used the chair and the wall as props, and to help give some weight to the images.

All images are taken on a Sony A7R with a Zeiss prime 55mm F1.8.

{61]

I have asked Elaine to form a natural pose and look away from the camera. The blinds on the window are slightly closed to give some lines of light so as to not make the image too flat. I have asked Elaine to place her hands in a relaxed position.

{62]

This image now includes a three quarter shot to include the legs. Using the chair again as in the above image, this time I have Elaine looking away from the window at 90 degrees while her body is front lit. Hands again are in a relaxed form. I’m taking care not to get too close to the subject as in this image the nearest hand would become enlarged.

[63]

We now have Elaine looking directly at the camera. This demands attention form the viewer and creates eye contact. I noticed later that Elaine is wearing her expensive watch and her hand position could almost be used to promote the watch, with a few slight adjustments to bring the wrist closer to the camera. I have leaned down slightly to bring the camera lens to eye level of Elaine and asked Elaine to lean into the frame.

[64]

Almost the same image as the one above [63] but I have the subject now place her head to one side. I think this image gives a little more of a relaxed feel to the one above.

[65]

Moving on to whole body shots, I had done some research and come across images where the subject is just leaning against the wall. I used the wall at home but left in the chest and lights as props. I had Elaine look at the camera and fold her arms, while having a relaxed stance.

[66]

Another full body shot, this time Elaine is looking away from the camera towards the window. This is helping to remove any shadows on the left side of her face so this could be used with more processing in post as a high key shot. I had Elaine change her hands and placed them in her pockets giving a relaxed feel to the shot.

[67]

This final image is again next to the wall, but the change is both in the half body crop and hand position. Im having Elaine look towards the lens to once again have the attention of the viewer, and the crossed arms gives a slightly more business like look, as if she is the CEO of a company. The white wall is acting as a reflector on the right side of her face which is bringing back the highlights which would otherwise be too dark.

Conclusion:

I think this exercise shows how important body position and hand position are in the image, depending on what the photographer wishes to achieve. Hand position is very important and as is the position of the camera, especially when the camera is getting close to the subject which could enlarge the nearest hand making it look out of shape. Moving the camera up or down to bring the lens to eye level is also important. If these were images of children for example it would almost certainly all be taken from eye level of the child.

Time permitting the type of clothes would also change the feel of the image drastically. I was going to have the subject wear a suit and have some type of business feel to the images, but I decided to go for a slightly less formal look.

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s